Omorashi

Japanese produced omorashi media also include comic books and animation. These range from independently produced d?jinshi to large commercially produced manga. Some focus exclusively on omorashi stories, while others include only the occasional scene. Some contain obvious sexual themes and could be considered a form of H manga, while others, like Iinari! Aibure-shon are famous as all-ages comics, featuring only mild ecchi content such as panchira.Canned Dogs Blog Archive Iinari! Aibure-shon toilet paper Wetting scenes have existed in anime as early as the popular Devilman of the 1970s. However, these did not have the erotic context which characterizes modern omorashi media, since they predated the first full-blown anime pornography, which was not available until 1984, when the advent of the first H anime OVAs such as Wonder Kids' Lolita Anime were made possible by the widespread availability of home video. One example of this later erotic context is the 1994 H anime OVA Vixens, which features scenes of incontinence in a setting that is overtly sexual.

Collectibles

With the translation of omorashi into manga and its subsequent adoption by otaku fandom, a number of omorashi themed collectibles have appeared on the Japanese market, including "Shizukuishi kyuun kyuun toilet paper"????!???????? ????!???????? ????????????????? | ???????????????????? printed with wetting scenes featuring Shizukuishi, a popular character from the omorashi manga, Iinari! Aibure-shon.Canned Dogs Blog Archive Iinari! Aibure-shon toilet paper

Acceptance

Public urination in general (both within and outside of fetish subculture) is considered far more acceptable in Japan than in some Western countries.c o n b i n i b e n t o . c o m Ew Public nudity is also considered a lesser social taboo.Dan in Japan - I Never Expected...

Western publications and media

Because of the western stigmas in numerous countries against wetting, omorashi subculture has not received such diverse exposure in non-Japanese media. In some countries, governments have even banned such materials. In New Zealand for example, creating, trading, distributing (e.g. making available on one's web page) anything containing "the use of urine or excrement in association with degrading or dehumanising conduct or sexual conduct" is a felony punishable by up to ten (10) years in jail.

In print

One such example is the Australia based, internationally distributed . Wet Set Magazine. The welcome header on their website reads:

Though Wet Set publications were originally only available in English, readership in German speaking countries has since proved high enough to justify printing some materials in German.

Though Wet Set does not generally acknowledge the comparatively large Asian fan base over any other country, some Western proponents of omorashi recognize a heavy Asian influence. For instance, in a February 2006 issue of The Brooklyn Rail, American poet Garrett Caples of Oakland, California chose to describe the shooting of an omorashi film in a Japanese setting.

Aside from lending Western omorashi media an "authentic" quality, the inclusion of Japanese models and settings might also be seen as an attempt to play upon the stereotype of ultrapassivity globally associated with Asian women, further enhancing their moe qualities and catering to Asian fetishists.

In music

Cat Chaser Conspiracy, an American all-girl punk rock band, became known during the 80s and 90s for performing a panty-wetting stage act as they played songs about wetting themselves. Some "wetty gurl" fans would wet themselves when these songs were played.Cat Chaser Conspiracy Before their breakup in 1999, members made regular appearances in the pages of Wet Set magazine. Their second vocalist, Moppet, appeared as a model in a number of photosets, including #84 through 89.

Other examples of omorashi in English language rock music include another all-female group, Crucified Barbara, from Sweden. Their song "I Wet Myself" from their debut album In Distortion We Trust states:

It is notable that although these bands maintain the trend of presenting female incontinence as the object of eroticism, their musical styles owe a great deal to the riot grrl movement and empower female wetters rather than emphasizing helplessness. For instance, in the line quoted above, the band makes use of double entendre to switch the focus from the embarrassing realization of her accident in the first verse ("Oh no, I'm getting wet") to the empowerment of her sexual arousal ("Oh yeah, I'm getting wet.")

An example of a male perspective is the Stone Temple Pilots song "Wet My Bed," which eschews a direct sexual connotation for one of the male protagonist's willing surrender of control to a girl named Mary.

The Leak

In 2005, public wetting became something of a trend among female American sex symbols when Fergie of the popular hip-hop group Black Eyed Peas wet herself on stage at the San Diego Street Scene festival. During the next several months, a sudden rash of celebrity wettings garnered much publicity and was labeled "The Leak." Following Fergie's performance, Jenny McCarthy wet her pants on Howard Stern's radio show, followed by Lindsay Lohan barely a week after. Later, Paris Hilton caused a publicly stir of her own when she wet herself publicly on two separate occasions. A month after Paris's second accident, Fergie was photographed at the 48th Grammy Awards with an obvious yellow stain on the crotch of her dress. A few months later, during the November 15th, 2006 broadcasting of Playboy Radio's "Night Calls" program, radio hostess Christy Canyon and her co-host Ginger Lynn diapered each other on the air. They proceeded to wet themselves and pose for photographs. Fergie, who had initially denied her trend setting accident, later appeared on The Dame Edna Show and spoke openly about the experience. Though she would bring it up again during an interview with the British Heat magazine, the singer claimed that she would "never live it down."

See also

External links

Index: A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

This article is based on "Omorashi" from the free encyclopedia Wikipedia (http://en.wikipedia.org). It is licensed under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation Licencse. In the Wikipedia you can find a list of the authors by visiting the following address: http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Omorashi&action=history