Porn creep

Porn creep is the process by which it is claimed sexually explicit content enters American pop culture. The term is analogous to Paul Fussell's "prole creep," which describes the process of markers of lower class gradually becoming more broadly accepted. Some people blame (or credit) the abundance of sexual imagery and innuendo in movies, television and advertising on the increased accessibility and "cool factor" of pornography. It is also now a colloquialism to describe a condition in which a person is unable to engage in any form of sexual activity without the presence of pornographic stimulus.(Rupert.L)

The term porn creep is related to the psychological concept of escalation in violent and/or sexual behavior, whereby the graphic or physical nature of certain acts becomes more extreme (or escalates) over time. Naomi Wolf, a famous feminist author from the 1990s, penned an article entitled The Porn Myth in New York Magazine in which she famously argued, "In the end, porn doesn't whet men's appetites—it turns them off the real thing."

Some critics express skepticism over the existence and significance of porn creep. For example, Eric Schlosser, in Reefer Madness, argues that cultural fascination with pornographic imagery could actually decrease as such material becomes more commonplace and less controversial, pointing to the example of Denmark, where despite the legality and wide availability of pornographic material, public interest in, and consumption of, pornography has dropped since the 1970s.

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This article is based on "Porn creep" from the free encyclopedia Wikipedia (http://en.wikipedia.org). It is licensed under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation Licencse. In the Wikipedia you can find a list of the authors by visiting the following address: http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Porn+creep&action=history